All lines of enquiry related to this area of the CQC inspection are listed below. Visit the CQC website if you need to clarify which ones relate to your service.

To learn more about how to gain access to our products and services, click here

  1. Click on one of the icons related to the Care Quality Commission inspection questions: is it safe, effective, caring, responsive or well-led. This will show the key lines of enquiry (KLOEs) associated with each question.
  2. Choose the KLOEs that relate to the type of service you provide (eg residential adult social care, community adult social care and hospices). This will reveal the resources most relevant to your type of service.
  3. Add the products you are interested in to My List.
  4. Go through each KLOE and continue to Add to My List. You can edit your list at any stage by deleting or adding more items.
  5. Email your list to yourself or colleagues. Just fill in your email address and press Send. You don’t need to register on Care Improvement Works to do this.
  6. Open your email and click on the links to the products in your list.

Prompts that may be used by CQC inspectors to explore this…

R1.1 How do people, or those with authority to act on their behalf, contribute to planning their care and support, and how are their strengths, levels of independence and quality of life taken into account?

R1.2 How does the service make sure that a person’s care plan fully reflects their physical, mental, emotional and social needs, including on the grounds of protected characteristics under the Equality Act? These should include their personal history, individual preferences, interests and aspirations, and should be understood by staff so people have as much choice and control as possible.

R1.3 Where the service is responsible, how are people supported to follow their interests and take part in activities that are socially and culturally relevant and appropriate to them, including in the wider community, and where appropriate, have access to education and work opportunities? Relates to: Services that provide or support activities, hobbies, community contact, employment and education support as well as personal care.

R1.4 Where the service is responsible, how are people encouraged and supported to develop and maintain relationships with people that matter to them, both within the service and the wider community, and to avoid social isolation? Relates to: Services that enable or support contact with families, friends and others in the community as well as personal care.

R1.5 How does the service identify and meet the information and communication needs of people with a disability or sensory loss? How does it record, highlight and share this information with others when required, and gain people’s consent to do so?

R1.6 How is technology used to support people to receive timely care and support? Is the technology (including telephone systems, call systems and online/digital services) easy to use? 

Products that can help include...

Person-centred care (Good and outstanding care guide)
Person-centred care (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • Involve people in decision making, provide consistent levels of person-centred care, etc.
  • Avoid failing to record and monitor people's preferences, assuming what people life or don't like etc.

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Care plans (Good and outstanding care guide)
Care plans (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • Plan care with the person and not for the person, ensure the care plan is detailed but understood by all (including the person needing care and support) etc.
  • Avoid incomplete or out of date care plans, not giving new staff the time to read them etc.

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Maximising independence (Good and outstanding care guide)
Maximising independence (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • Support hobbies and interests, help people engage with the local community, empower people to meet personal goals etc.
  • Avoid staff being too busy or uninterested in supporting activities, offering activities that do not meet people's needs etc.

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Care Certificate
Care Certificate

Using our guidance, free workbooks and presentations make sure new workers meet the Care Certificate standards for: 

  • equality and diversity
  • work in a person centred way
  • handling information
  • awareness of mental health, learning disabilities and dementia

These standards are closely linked to delivering care which is responsive to peoples needs.


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Dignity in care : Communication (2014)
Dignity in care : Communication (2014)

This film shows how good communication is essential to ensure dignity in care. Examples include:

  • skills staff use to communicate with diverse populations
  • how technology can be used in communication

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Older people and quality of life (2014)
Older people and quality of life (2014)

Two films featuring older people living both in residential care and the community talking about how they wish to be treated​


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Care homes - Action planning tool (2017)
Care homes - Action planning tool (2017)

This action planning tool is for managers and owners of care homes for older people.  It will help to:

  • Build a shared understanding of what personalisation (or person-centred care) means in a care home setting
  • Identify and plan practical improvements that will ma

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Older people and quality of life: better life in residential care (2014)
Older people and quality of life: better life in residential care (2014)

This film helps in understanding what is important in the lives of people with high support needs who live in a care home. They talk about:

  • what is important in their lives
  • how they like to be treated

The film is based around the Joseph Rowntree Foundation's (JRF) A Better Life programme.


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Getting to Know You (2013)
Getting to Know You (2013)

This free e-learning resource supports learning about how to provide effective personalisation and high quality care and support through the use of one page profiles


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Personalisation: a rough guide (2012)
Personalisation: a rough guide (2012)

This interactive resource provides an introduction to personalisation. Use this guide to explore, for example:

  • what personalisation is
  • where the idea came from
  • what personalisation means for different social care users

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Personalisation (2011)
Personalisation (2011)

This set of 12 films highlight different aspects of personalisation in adult social care for specific groups of people using services:

  • learning disabilities
  • physical disabilities
  • older people
  • black and minority ethnic people

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Dementia: support in health and social care (2010) (QS1)
Dementia: support in health and social care (2010) (QS1)

NICE quality standard on care for people with dementia provided in community and health settings. It includes statements and measures on;

  • Assessment and personalised care plans
  • Emotional and social needs of carers
  • Respite services for carers

In particular, please see statements 4, 6, 7 & 10.


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Stroke in adults (2016 updated) (QS2)
Stroke in adults (2016 updated) (QS2)

NICE quality standard on stroke in adults. It includes a statement and measures on;

  • Regular review of health and social care needs

In particular, please see statement 7.


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Dementia: independence and wellbeing (2013) (QS30)
Dementia: independence and wellbeing (2013) (QS30)

NICE quality standard on care and support of people with dementia in social care settings. It includes statements and measures on;

  • discussing concerns about possible dementia
  • choice and control in decisions
  • reviewing needs and preferences when circumstances change
  • leisure activities of interest and choice
  • maintaining and developing relationships
  • accessing services to help maintain physical and mental health
  • design and adaptation of housing.

The statements are specific and concise and focus on priorities for quality improvement. This quality standard should be read alongside the NICE quality standard on Dementia: support in health and social care (see Effective - How are people supported to maintain good health, have access to healthcare services and receive ongoing healthcare support). In particular, please see statement 4.


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Home care for older people (2016) (QS123)
Home care for older people (2016) (QS123)

NICE quality standard on care and support for older people living in their own homes. It includes statements and measures on

  • Person-centred planning
  • Missed or late visits & consistency of home care workers
  • Length of home care visits

In particular, please see statements 1 & 5.


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Learning disabilities: identifying and managing mental health problems (2017) (QS142)
Learning disabilities: identifying and managing mental health problems (2017) (QS142)

NICE quality standard on the prevention, assessment and management of mental health problems in people with learning disabilities in all settings. It includes statements and measures on;

  • mental health assessments
  • key workers
  • tailoring psychological interventions.

The statements are specific and concise and focus on priorities for quality improvement. In particular, please see statements 1, 2 & 4.


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Violent and aggressive behaviours in people with mental health problems (2017) (QS154
Violent and aggressive behaviours in people with mental health problems (2017) (QS154

NICE quality standard on short-term prevention and management of violent and physically threatening behaviour among adults, children and young people with a mental health problem. It includes statements and measures on;

  • Identifying triggers and warning signs
  • Prevening and managing violent and aggressive behaviour

In particular, please see statement 2.


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Better home care for older people: A quick guide for people who arrange their own home care (2016)
Better home care for older people: A quick guide for people who arrange their own home care (2016)

This is a short and visually appealing guide for people who arrange their own home care, containing key information from the relevant NICE guidance.


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Intermediate care including reablement (2017) (NG74)
Intermediate care including reablement (2017) (NG74)

 The guideline covers referral and assessment for intermediate care and how to deliver the service. It outlines core principles of intermediate care and reablement, delivery of intermediate care and transition from intermediate care. The guideline also covers training and development.


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Communication (Good and outstanding care guide)
Communication (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • What to ensure staff have the skills to effectively engage and respond to the needs of people who use the service and others who engage
  • How to avoid poor and unresponsive approaches to communication

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Using technology (Good and outstanding care guide)
Using technology (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • What to consider when creating a culture where technology supports the people to receive better care
  • How to avoid technology that does not benefit the people who need care and support

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NG86 People's experience in adult social care services: improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services (2018)
NG86 People's experience in adult social care services: improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services (2018)

This guideline covers the care and support of adults receiving social care in their own homes, residential care and community settings. It aims to help people understand what care they can expect and to improve their experience by supporting them to make decisions about their care.


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Prompts that may be used by CQC inspectors to explore this…

R2.1 How well do people who use the service know how to make a complaint or raise concerns and how comfortable do they feel doing so in their own way? How well are people encouraged to do so, and how confident are they to speak up?

R2.2 How easy and accessible is it for people to use the complaints process or raise a concern? To what extent are people treated compassionately and given the help and support they need to make a complaint?

R2.3 How effectively are complaints handled, including ensuring openness and transparency, confidentiality, regular updates for the complainant, a timely response and explanation of the outcome, and a formal record?

R2.4 How are people who raise concerns or complaints protected from discrimination, harassment or disadvantage?

R2.5 To what extent are concerns and complaints used as an opportunity to learn and drive continuous improvement?

Products that can help include...

North West Dignity Leads Network (Challenging Poor Practice) (Learn from Others)
North West Dignity Leads Network (Challenging Poor Practice) (Learn from Others)

Use the award winning free training materials developed by adult social care employers in the North West to help you challenge poor performance. Available in the Additional Good Practice section of Learn from Others.​


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Comments, compliments and complaints (Good and outstanding care guide)
Comments, compliments and complaints (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • Provide multiple ways for people to raise complaints and concerns, promote a transparent culture, investigate and document issues etc.
  • Avoid people and staff not knowing how to complain, failure to follow up concerns etc.

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Whistleblowing: improving organisational practice (2014)
Whistleblowing: improving organisational practice (2014)

This film identifies ways in which organisations can create a safe environment for staff to raise concerns openly as part of normal day-to-day practice. These include:

  • how managers and staff need to respond to whistleblowers
  • the need for an open culture

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Personalisation for older people: residential care (2009)
Personalisation for older people: residential care (2009)

This film helps in understanding the value of personalisation for older people in residential care. Important factors include:

  • understanding the individual and their interests
  • finding out about background and personal history
  • supporting family and carers

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Dignity in Care: Complaints (2013)
Dignity in Care: Complaints (2013)

Use this guide to support the development of a fair, open and honest culture around complaints. Aimed at staff and managers, sections include:

  • complaints for workers and providers
  • social care complaints regulations
  • what the research and policy says
  • what others are doing

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Relates to: Services that provide care to people at the end of their lives. Prompts that may be used by CQC inspectors to explore this…

R3.1 Are people’s preferences and choices for their end of life care and where they wish to die, including in relation to their protected equality characteristics, spiritual and cultural needs, clearly recorded, communicated, kept under review and acted on?

R3.2 How are people, and their family, friends and other carers, involved in planning, managing and making decisions about their end of life care?

R3.3 How are people reassured that their pain and other symptoms will be assessed and managed effectively as they approach the end of their life, including having access to support from specialist palliative care professionals, particularly if they are unable to speak or communicate?

R3.4 How does the service make sure that it quickly identifies people in the last days of life whose condition may be unpredictable and change rapidly and, where required, that people have rapid access to support, equipment and medicines?

R3.5 How does the service support people’s families, other people using the service and staff when someone dies?

R3.6 What arrangements are there for making sure that the body of a person who has died is cared for in a culturally sensitive and dignified way? 

Products that can help include...

End of Life Guidance and Resources
End of Life Guidance and Resources

If you're service is delivering end of life care, make sure you are familiar with the resources available to help you and your staff.  These include

  • Common Core Principles and Competences for End of Life Care
  • E-learning for End of Life Care (free access for users of the NMDS-SC system)
  • A guide to delivering quality standards in care homesA training guide for homecare workers

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Learn from Others - End of life care section
Learn from Others - End of life care section

​Case studies and additional free learning materials​ from care organisations delivering end of life care


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End of life care (Good and outstanding care guide)
End of life care (Good and outstanding care guide)

Recommendations and practical examples from services rated good and outstanding including;

  • Create and maintain advanced end of life care plans, establish close links with end of life care specialists etc.
  • Staff unprepared to provide end of life care, staffing levels too low to provide extra care needed etc.

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Working together: Improving end of life care through better integration
Working together: Improving end of life care through better integration

Improve end of life care in your organisation by increasing your staffs awareness and understanding, using this practical training pack. 


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End of life care: why talking about death and dying matters (2013)
End of life care: why talking about death and dying matters (2013)

This film looks at how personalised care can be achieved through the Living Well tool. The process involves:

  • creating a simple one page profile
  • recording a person's needs and wishes
  • sharing the profile by everyone involved in the person’s care

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End of life care (2014)
End of life care (2014)

Use this series of films to find out about issues pertinent to delivering effective end of life care in different care settings.
Issues include:

  • communication & talking about death and dying
  • planned and coordinated approach
  • supporting family carers
  • dignity in end of life care

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End of life care for people with dementia living in care homes (2012)
End of life care for people with dementia living in care homes (2012)

Use this research overview to find out what is involved in providing end of life care to people living with dementia in a care home. Perspectives of care home residents, carers and providers are considered. Includes:

  • advance care planning
  • access to specialist palliative care and support
  • staff training
  • measuring the outcomes of end of life care

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Dying well at home: the case for integrated working (2013)
Dying well at home: the case for integrated working (2013)

​The guide is aimed at practitioners and managers supporting people with end of life care needs across the health, social care and housing sectors. 


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End of life care - why it is essential to coordinate care (2014)
End of life care - why it is essential to coordinate care (2014)

Use this film to find out how end of life care can be improved through the effective coordination of health and social care services. Messages for practice include:

  • the need for effective communication
  • clarity about coordination
  • the need for a single point of contact for the person who is at end of life

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End of life care for adults (2017 updated) (QS13)
End of life care for adults (2017 updated) (QS13)

NICE quality standard on end of life care for adults in all settings and services. This includes adults who die suddenly or after a very brief illness. It includes statements and measures on;

  • identifying people approaching the end of life
  • communication and information
  • assessment, care planning and review
  • meeting individual needs
  • support to families and carers
  • coordinated care
  • specialist palliative care.

The statements are specific and concise and focus on priorities for quality improvement. In particular, please see statements 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 & 16.


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Care of dying adults in the last days of life (2017) (QS144)
Care of dying adults in the last days of life (2017) (QS144)

NICE quality standard on the care of adults who are dying during the last 2 to 3 days of life. It includes statements and measures on

  • monitoring people who may be in the last days of life
  • individualised care plans
  • anticipatory medicines
  • hydration.

The statements are specific and concise and focus on priorities for quality improvement. In particular, please see statements 1, 2, 3 & 4.


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